thinkmore

181

Posted in things we like by hemmant jha on April 27, 2010

everyday design : bottled goodness.

Growing up in India, it was generally regarded that a bottled product was manufactured under hygienic conditions – and that it was safer and better to consume than something about whose lineage one knew nothing, aka, something made fresh by entities unknown. Entities unknown included [and still include] the entire cadre of kitchen and service staff at any dining establishment, posh or otherwise. A Coke was less likely to cause grief than an unmarked glass of lemonade – simplistic, but that’s just how it was.

Whether this assumption was driven by relentless advertising, fueled by stunningly large marketing budgets, or by slogans generally pithy and meaningless, one will never know. Presented below is a shortlist of campaigns from this piece on associatedcontent.com. – for more comprehensive coverage going back to 1886, please visit this link to the Library of Congress.

1969: “It’s the Real Thing”

1974: “Look Up America”

1976: “Coke Adds Life”

1979: “Have a Coke and Smile”

1982: “Coke is It”

1986: “Catch the Wave (Coca-Cola)”

1987: “When Coca-Cola Is a Part of Your Life, You Can’t Beat the Feeling”

1988: “You Can’t Beat the Feeling”

1989: “Official Soft Drink of Summer”

1990: “You Can’t Beat the Real Thing”

1993-1999: “Always, Coca-Cola”

Especially in the developed world, the situation is changing – bottled products are now regarded as being composed of ingredients either ordinary or unpronounceable, and traces of the corporate response to these concerns can now be seen. Debatable sanitary / safety benefits aside, a bottled product is unlikely to be a better source of nutrition and sustenance than something made fresh.

Ethnic supermarkets are such a marvelous repository of edible goods from across the world – the larger the market, the more the aisles, the more the aisles, the more the chance that something exciting, hitherto unseen, lurks around the corner. In this post are presented examples of bottled goods – all manner of sauces and drinks. Taste tests and health concerns aside, the imagery alone warrants documentation of these goods.

This post picks up where 179 ‘vacuum packed goodness’ and 180sealed goodness’ left off.

180

Posted in things we like by hemmant jha on April 22, 2010

everyday design : sealed goodness.

Ethnic supermarkets are such a marvelous repository of edible goods from across the world – the larger the market, the more the aisles, the more the aisles, the more the chance that something exciting, hitherto unseen, lurks around the corner.

This post picks up where 179 ‘vacuum packed goodness’ left off.

179

Posted in things we like by hemmant jha on April 17, 2010

everyday design : vacuum packed goodness.

Ethnic supermarkets are such a marvelous repository of edible goods from across the world – the larger the market, the more the aisles, the more the aisles, the more the chance that something exciting, hitherto unseen, lurks around the corner.

Was it produced across the seven seas by dexterous artisans few or unwieldy corporate machine in sprawling compound? Is it a poseur or the real thing? One may never know – taste test aside, just the sheer breadth of offerings on display is enough to take one’s breath away. Presented below are just a few representative examples sealed in plastic. More to follow.

178

Posted in things we like, tools of the trade by hemmant jha on April 13, 2010

Single Origin Espresso.

As the more avid coffee drinkers amongst you are undoubtedly aware, there’s a little outfit out of Chicago called Intelligentsia. Working on a project in close proximity to an outpost of this coffee house has provided ample opportunity for us to partake of the fruits of their expertise. Put simply, I’ve yet to have a better espresso experience than what is provided by their SOE.

I am an espresso drinker and have written off the espresso experience at all chains – Starbucks is undrinkable, the standard version at Peet’s is pretty good, but not outstanding [their latte macchiato, however, is. In the right hands, the foam is sublime – pure velvet]. Until now, all these have paled in comparison to a particularly good espresso I had in Milan a few years ago. Wandering about the city during Design Week one morning, I happened upon a small coffee shop at the flagship store of a major fashion house. A fashion house with its own coffee shop sounded reasonable enough, but how good could it possibly be? The china was plain white, the service brisk and efficient, the price reasonable, the espresso a revelation. Perfectly roasted, perfectly rounded jammy, fruity brown goodness. Sadly enough, it’s been a long wait to find another cup of similar qualifications [and many thousands of dollars wasted on less than stellar brew].

The SOE at Intelligentsia changes all that – simply can’t get enough. Perfectly roasted, perfectly prepared – far from the burnt and murky mess most of us out there are used to [some permanently turned off by]. The uniqueness of regional beans shines through – the bite, the fruit, the acidity, the finish – all on glorious display on the tongue.

Get it while it lasts.

177

Posted in tools of the trade by hemmant jha on April 6, 2010

Floating around in the ether are many words and phrases one may live by – profound thoughts that guide and shape one’s life or the operational approach of one’s design practice. For an anthem to live and work by, one might take a listen to ‘Walk on’ by Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee [lyrics here].

Fortunately, the fortune cookie still stands tall as a valuable repository of inspirational notes, providing ever more reason to persevere. The first one’s remarkable for the clarity of message and that little encouraging push it contains.

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