thinkmore

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Posted in good design, things we like, tools of the trade by hemmant jha on August 20, 2010

Tommy Larsen key ring, as seen on the thinkmore WoF. in the pocket of this author.

Fashioned from a single piece of stainless steel, this is a superbly minimal piece of design. The stainless loop is shaped to a narrower diameter at the apex of the loop, which allows for flex – keys can be inserted and removed easily. The piece is nicely finished, smooth to the touch, in pocket and out. What more could one ask of a key ring?

I’ve looked for Tommy Larsen’s website / whereabouts online – no luck. Anyone out there know him?

200

Posted in good design, things we like, tools of the trade by hemmant jha on August 15, 2010

Braun ABW31 wall clock, as seen on the thinkmore WoF.

This is classic, classic industrial design – elements distilled down to their most essential, the materials appropriate, the markings meaningful and minimal, the controls accessible and logical. This deserves a place in every designer’s collection, and ought to be used more often as an example of what good design is all about. Clearly, this is not to say that there cannot be, or that there should not be, other approaches to design. There are rare instances when an idea has produced a physical manifestation that’s this close to being a perfect translation of the original idea, and that’s what makes this a classic.

There have been variants produced over the last 25 years – a silver, painted plastic version [buy only if nothing else is available], a version with a little digital insert [influenced by a Braun wristwatch], possibly others – but this is the version for the purist. The ABW31 is inexpensive to produce, and timepieces are perfectly valid even today. Braun no longer produces the wide variety of products that they once did, but if they were to reissue anything, may the corporate gods that govern them allow this to make the list.

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Posted in good design, things we like, tools of the trade by hemmant jha on August 9, 2010

WIHA hand tools, as seen on the thinkmore WoF.

For tasks where a carelessly stripped head or a slip might mean a serious investment in repairs or refurbishment, we suggest using Wiha tools – well made tips and handles, hard wearing and built to last. Not the least expensive tools, certainly, but less expensive than a slip-up. I imagine the average audiophile slip-up is about $1K, or thereabouts – to avoid such grief, we have Wiha sets and individual tools spanning standard, everyday use to non-magnetic, even ceramic – highly recommended.

For an idea of size, the pegs on the wall are 4″ on center, about 10cm.

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Posted in good design, things we like, tools of the trade by hemmant jha on August 6, 2010

CAMPER shoes, as seen on the thinkmore WoF.

What Swatch did for watches, Camper seems to have done for shoes. Often witty design, not silly expensive, generally innovative in materials and approach – in some ways, the perfect shoe for the designer who finds stimulation+joy in bright ideas and their physical artifacts. And this approach extends throughout the Camper experience – the website, the little seasonal books, the small bag of wooden toys above, the shoes.

As the readers of this diminutive blog know, Camper makes the perfect driving shoe. Unfortunately, it is no longer in production – and this is bound to happen with a company constantly moving, changing, flexing. I’d suggest heading down to a Camper store today – if there’s a shoe that fits, clear out their inventory or someone else will.

For an idea of size, the pegs on the wall are 4″ on center, about 10cm.

197

Posted in good design, things we like, tools of the trade by hemmant jha on August 5, 2010

Great little multi-purpose brush by C-THRU, as seen on the thinkmore WoF.

With horsehair bristles and a simple plastic body+handle, this bright orange German made brush is a perfect little studio tool. Dust-off those Salvation Army vinyl finds, or sweep leftover bits from a model-making surface. Unlike plastic bristles, these wear more easily and more gracefully. And that’s not much of an issue, since we all wear too – adds character, or so I’m told.

For an idea of size, the pegs on the wall are 4″ on center, about 10cm.

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